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Hand, Wrist & Elbow

Normal Hand Anatomy

The hand in the human body is made up of the wrist, palm, and fingers. The most flexible part of the human skeleton, the hand enables us to perform many of our daily activities. When our hand and wrist are not functioning properly, daily activities such as driving a car, bathing, and cooking can become impossible.

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Normal Anatomy of the Elbow

The arm in the human body is made up of three bones that join together to form a hinge joint called the elbow. The upper arm bone or humerus connects from the shoulder to the elbow forming the top of the hinge joint.

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Tennis Elbow

Tennis elbow is the common name for the elbow condition lateral epicondylitis. It is an overuse injury that causes inflammation of the tendons that attach to the bony prominence on the outside of the elbow. It is a painful condition occurring from repeated muscle contractions in the forearm that leads to inflammation and microtears in the tendons that attach to the lateral epicondyle. The lateral epicondyle is the bony prominence that is felt on the outside of the elbow and the condition is more common in sports individuals playing tennis.

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Trigger Finger

Trigger Finger, also known as stenosing tenosynovitis or flexor tendonitis, is a condition where one of the fingers or thumb of the hand is caught in a bent position.

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Dupuytren’s Contracture

Dupuytren’s contracture is thickening of the fibrous tissue layer under the skin of palms, fingers, and hands which leads to curving of the finger. It is caused due to the excessive production of collagen which gets deposited under the skin.

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DeQuervain’s Tenosynovitis

DeQuervain’s Tenosynovitis is a hand condition affecting a patients’ ability to move their thumb. It used to be referred to as washerwoman’s sprain or mother’s wrist but with the advent of technology, is now commonly referred to as “Blackberry thumb” from typing and texting on small handheld devices.

For more information about DeQuervain’s Tenosynovitis click on below tabs.

Carpal Tunnel Syndrome

Carpal tunnel syndrome is a common hand problem resulting from pressure on the median nerve at the wrist. Symptoms, which are often worse at night, consist of numbness and/or pain in the wrist and fingers. Eventually there is loss of strength, fine motor control and sensation.

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Arthroscopic Wrist Surgery

Wrist is also called as carpus, a complex joint comprised of bones and joints, ligaments and tendons, nerves, blood vessels, and muscles that hold the bones together.

For more information about Arthroscopic Wrist Surgery click on below tabs.

Elbow Arthroscopy

The elbow is the joint that connects the upper arm bone and the forearm bones. Elbow joint helps in movement of the arms forward, backward, as well as to twist the arms inside and outside.

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Cubital Tunnel Syndrome

Cubital tunnel release surgery is the surgery to correct the cubital tunnel syndrome. Cubital tunnel syndrome, also called ulnar nerve entrapment is a condition caused by compression of the ulnar nerve in an area of the elbow called the cubital tunnel. The ulnar nerve travels down the back of the elbow behind the bony bump called the medial epicondyle and through a passageway called the cubital tunnel.

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Biceps Tendon Repair

The biceps muscle, located in the front of the upper arm allows you to bend the elbow and rotate the arm. Biceps tendons attach the biceps muscle to the bones in the shoulder and in the elbow.

Biceps tear can be complete or partial. Partial biceps tendon tears will not completely break the tendon. Complete tendon tears will break the tendon into two parts.

Find out more about Bicep Ruptures from the following links.

Program to Return to Throwing Sports After an Injury

Click on the topics below to find out more from the Orthopaedic connection website ofAmerican Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons.

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