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Shoulder

Rotator Cuff Tear

Rotator cuff is the group of tendons in the shoulder joint providing support and enabling wider range of motion. Major injury to these tendons may result in tear of these tendons and the condition is called as rotator cuff tear.

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Shoulder Impingement

Shoulder impingement is also called as swimmer’s shoulder, tennis shoulder, or rotator cuff tendinitis. It is the condition of inflammation of the tendons of the shoulder joint caused by motor vehicle accidents, trauma, and while playing sports such as tennis, baseball, swimming and weight lifting.

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Shoulder Arthroscopy

Shoulder arthroscopy is a surgical procedure in which an arthroscope is inserted into the shoulder joint. The benefits of arthroscopy are smaller incisions, faster healing, a more rapid recovery, and less scarring. Arthroscopic surgical procedures are often performed on an outpatient basis and the patient is able to return home on the same day.

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Frozen Shoulder

Frozen shoulder is the condition of painful shoulder limiting the movements because of pain and inflammation. It is also called as adhesive capsulitis and may progress to the state where an individual may feel very hard to move the shoulder.

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Shoulder Joint Replacement

Shoulder joint replacements are usually done to relieve pain and when all non-operative treatment to relieve pain have failed.

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Reverse Shoulder Replacement

Reverse Shoulder replacement is an alternative surgery for patients who have torn their rotator cuffs and have developed severe arthritis or who have had a previous total shoulder replacement that has failed to relieve their pain.  Rotator cuff is the group of four tendons that join the head of the humerus (arm bone) to the deeper muscles and provides stability and mobility to the shoulder joint.

The surgery is done under regional or general anesthesia. An incision is made over the affected shoulder to expose the shoulder joint.  In normal procedure, metal ball is placed at end of upper arm bone and the socket into the shoulder bone. However in a reverse shoulder replacement, the metal ball is attached to the shoulder bone and the socket is placed at the end of the upper arm bone.  By switching the prosthetics, the patient will now be able to use their deltoid muscle, instead of the torn rotator cuff, to enable lifting of their arm.  After the artificial components are implanted the joint capsule is stitched and the wound is closed.

Reverse Shoulder replacement surgery is performed through a larger open incision due to the complexity of the operation and usually involves a hospital stay of a few days.

Shoulder Instability

Shoulder instability is a chronic condition that causes frequent dislocations of the shoulder joint. A dislocation occurs when the end of the humerus (the ball portion) partially or completely dislocates from the glenoid (the socket portion) of the shoulder. A partial dislocation is referred to as a subluxation whereas a complete separation is referred to as a dislocation.

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Acromioclavicular joint (AC joint) Separation

Acromioclavicular joint (AC joint) dislocation or shoulder separation is one of the most common injuries of the upper arm. It involves separation of the AC joint and injury to the ligaments that support the joint. The AC joint forms where the clavicle (collarbone) meets the shoulder blade (acromion).

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Anatomic reconstruction

Of late, research has been focused on improving surgical techniques used to reconstruct the severely separated AC joint. The novel reconstruction technique that has been designed to reconstruct the AC joint in an anatomic manner is known as anatomic reconstruction. Anatomic reconstruction of the AC joint ensures static and safe fixation and stable joint functions.

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Labral Tear

The shoulder joint is a "ball and socket" joint that enables the smooth gliding and thereby the movements of arms. However it is inherently unstable because of the shallow socket. A soft rim of cartilage, the labrum lines the socket and deepens it so that it accommodates the head of the upper arm bone better.

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Click on the topics below to find out more from the Orthopaedic connection website of American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons.

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